New Agrarian Voices

Learn about the impressions and experiences of each year's cohort of apprentices in their own words.

Susan Elder, APPRENTICE, Charter Ranch, MT

REFLECTIONS AFTER THE FIRST MONTH

My path to working with Land has been a bit wandering. I’d like to capitalize “Land” because to me, Land is a character. Throughout the narrative of my life, Land has appeared (or I have become aware of her) around the corner of every plot curve — influencing, inviting, being. To me, Land is more than soil, or the plants that people its surface — it is all of us, we living beings, great and small. We are Land. Even as we observe her, we are her.  Despite or because of my wandering path to Land (or back to her), I feel that I am beginning again where I started, and discovering Land, in all her character, as if for the first time.

I was raised as much by Kansas prairie and farm animals as by good parents. Our family found its way to a small farm outside of Wichita, Kansas, because my father needed space to raise a herd of horses and my mother needed space to raise a herd of children. Some of my first memories are riding on the neck of my father’s horse, coarse mane hair flowing through the grip of my small hands. As an introverted child, I spent a great deal of my time in the quiet companionship of powerful animals and the colorful company of prairie wildflowers. I’m sure I talked to grass and animals much more than people at that age. 

By eighteen, I was restless to see the world (Land urging me to witness her in all her variety? Perhaps). I wandered around Europe working on small farms with my sister and best friend. I returned to Kansas for university, but kept traveling the world through books, literature being the course of study I settled upon. Books led me around the globe, through time, into the minds of countless characters. After all that traveling, I found myself back with Land, studying her through literature. 

I remained in educational environments for a while, teaching this time. After a while, I felt an unmistakable invitation (who could it have been but Land?) to experience our continent. I followed the call to the Continental Divide Trail and due to a detour, found myself living in Montana. The apprenticeship opportunity offered by Quivira brought me to Charter Ranch. 

And so here I am. Back with grass and animals. How did I become interested in agriculture? I guess Land has been talking to me for a while now — I figured it was high time I learned how best to listen and respond. And this is what I hope for my time in this apprenticeship — that I continue to open my ear to Land’s voice, realizing my part in the whole, and learn how to respond with ready hands and heart.

FINAL REFLECTION

In my eight months working with Charter Ranch, I learned a thing or two. I learned how to fix a fence when most of the necessary tools were unavailable. I learned how to cook most cuts of beef over a campfire. I learned how to keep a level head when “all the cows are out…again.” I learned that every time you take your cowgal hat off, you need to place it upside down (let gravity keep that curve nice). I learned that if the truck starts, it’s going to be a good day. I learned that sometimes dogs are just plain mean — and even mean dogs like a little love every now and again. I learned that worms have sex too – and you might as well give them a bit of privacy while they are at it. I learned that wildfires happen and there’s absolutely no stopping that train. I learned that chaps make you feel like the real deal, but am still pretty sure they are mostly a fashion statement. I learned that being a real cowboy is more like being a good mother than anything else. I learned that you can’t run a ranch without neighbors. Finally, I learned (and it’s more of a remembering than anything) that I love grass and I love a big sky and I love working with animals and I’ll never have enough of those loves no matter how long I live.

As with any love, my experience at Charter this year dealt me an even share of joys and challenges. The joys: the characters I encountered along the way. If you’ve never lived in rural  Montana, you’ve missed a great opportunity to encounter a wild cast of characters: dog, cow, horse, cowboy, or tree (the trees in Eastern Montana are a bit like the trees that Willa Cather describes in her native Nebraska: “so rare in that country, and they had to make such a hard fight to grow, that we used to feel anxious about them, and visit them as if they were persons”).  

A joy: when I first arrived on the ranch, most of my time was spent with the dogs. They were my co-workers and their personalities so distinctly their own. I love them all, but I have a soft spot for one: it’s something in the way those cloudy old eyes twinkle when I walk in the mud room. His name is Huckleberry and you’ve never met a huckleberry in all of Montana that is this sweet. He’s an old boy, shaggy as a collie comes and retired from his cow working days, but he guards the communal dog food like he’s paid top dollar to do it. In his line of duty, he got in a fight with his arch enemy Hank, the territorial dog who lives next door on the ranch. This multi-thousand acre ranch wasn’t big enough for the two of them, I guess. In the confusion, my own dog started fighting and the three of them went at it until Huckleberry was wounded (and we thought mortally) in the battle. That night and the following two days, we thought we’d lost the poor old boy. He wouldn’t move from beside the fire, so we brought the water bowl to him and fed him little bits of meat and gave him all the love we had thinking it would be our last chance to let him know how we felt. Miraculously, on the third day, he rose (yes this is a Jesus metaphor) from beside the fire and wanted to go outside to pee. Surprised and happy, we spent the next few days carefully letting Huck in and out of the house, helping him up and down stairs and watching him closely. We knew he was healthy again when he returned to protecting the dog food. And there he’ll be, weathering one more Montana winter and so many more, I hope. 

A Challenge: death is hard for me to deal with. It always has been and always will be, I imagine. I’m not sure why I’m built this way, or why people are all different in how they are struck by the reality of death, but from the time I was a little girl (maybe even before I understood the full reality of it) I was hurt by the idea of death. I’m surely not original in this. In working with life, you work with death. Maybe you have a different name for it; maybe you believe death is simply part of the cycle of that altogether more lovely and approachable word “life.” I like that idea, but however you think of it, death is difficult. I was offered the honor of working with so much life this season, and so much death too. I am learning, slowly, how to participate in that passing, in that cycle, and the hardest lesson is that I am not in control; I can only offer my best and the rest is up to some power outside of me. 

I plan to carry these loves and challenges with me into next year. I will remain working with Charter Ranch with a bit of a new focus: the worm herd. While I will continue to work with the cattle operation and do daily tasks with the ranch as a whole, I hope to spend the majority of my time developing the vermicast enterprise. I learned a great deal about how to care for the worms this year, and next year we hope to keep growing the business. If you don’t think the future of ranching is in worms, you haven’t ever talked to Steve Charter.  Steve believes (and I am now a disciple of said beliefs) that worms are powerful little creatures that have the potential to usher the soils of the world into a microbial renaissance. I’d like to be a part of that rebirth, a midwife of sorts if you will. If you are in the market for worms or their castings, here’s my pitch, you know where to find me and my worm herd. 

It’s been an honor and a joy working with Quivira and Charter and all these characters this year. I look forward to another. Cheers. 

More Voices

New Agrarian Voices – Peter Feehan

New Agrarian Voices – Peter Feehan

Peter Feehan, APPRENTICE, Seacross Ranch, MTREFLECTIONS AFTER THE FIRST MONTH I am certain that I am dedicating my life to agriculture. The specifics of this, however, are still unknown to me. I would like to have a regenerative farm or ranch. Where do I want to live?...

read more
New Agrarian Voices – Tyler Vandermark

New Agrarian Voices – Tyler Vandermark

Tyler Vandermark, APPRENTICE, Indreland Ranch, MTREFLECTIONS AFTER THE FIRST MONTH At 10 years old I knew I wanted to be an engineer just like my grandfather, whose towering presence and infinite knowledge enamored me. There was little doubt that I possessed the...

read more
New Agrarian Voices – Rex Rutledge

New Agrarian Voices – Rex Rutledge

Rex Rutledge, APPRENTICE, Seacross Ranch, MTREFLECTIONS AFTER THE FIRST MONTH In college I jumbled around with a few different majors until I found biology. One of my first courses on my way to my biology degree was general ecology. I was hooked the very first day...

read more
New Agrarian Voices – Natalie Berkman

New Agrarian Voices – Natalie Berkman

Natalie Berkman, APPRENTICE, Milton Ranch, MTREFLECTIONS AFTER THE FIRST MONTH My experience in agriculture started in 10th grade when I realized the only job I was qualified for was working at a farm stand on the side of a busy road. I started the job with hesitance...

read more
New Agrarian Voices – Megan Schmidgall

New Agrarian Voices – Megan Schmidgall

Megan Schmidgall, APPRENTICE, Chauvet Ranch, MTREFLECTIONS AFTER THE FIRST MONTH As a typical youth of this generation I graduated from high school and went to college without knowing specifically what line of work I wanted to pursue. Instead of switching my degree...

read more
New Agrarian Voices – Jeane Stafford

New Agrarian Voices – Jeane Stafford

Jeane Stafford, APPRENTICE, Shultz Ranch, MTREFLECTIONS AFTER THE FIRST MONTH My initial fascination with agriculture began early on in my childhood. Between my deep love for animals and growing up raising livestock on the family farm in northwestern Oregon, my...

read more
New Agrarian Voices – Brady Lux

New Agrarian Voices – Brady Lux

Brady Lux, APPRENTICE, Moe Ranch, MTREFLECTIONS AFTER THE FIRST MONTH Perhaps due to my being dyslexic and as a result a painfully slow reader I still haven’t got through the Sand County Almanac by Aldo Leapold that I started reading when I was a sophomore in high...

read more
New Agrarian Voices – Sam Schmidt

New Agrarian Voices – Sam Schmidt

Sam Schmidt, APPRENTICE, San Juan Ranch, COREFLECTIONS AFTER THE FIRST MONTH My becoming involved in agriculture began with the hard realization that the assumptions I had made about my life’s trajectory were wrong. I had just finished a one-and-a-half-year stint at a...

read more
New Agrarian Voices – Noelle Mcdonough

New Agrarian Voices – Noelle Mcdonough

Noelle Mcdonough, APPRENTICE, San Juan Ranch, COREFLECTIONS AFTER THE FIRST MONTH There were several forces at play that caused agriculture to find me and encouraged me to apply for the Quivira NAP apprenticeship at San Juan Ranch in Saguache, CO. Growing up in the...

read more
New Agrarian Voices – Julia Loman

New Agrarian Voices – Julia Loman

Julia Loman, APPRENTICE, Richards Ranch, COREFLECTIONS AFTER THE FIRST MONTH My interest in agriculture began in the city of Detroit, Michigan, of all places. Fresh out of college, I found myself helping out at a tiny urban garden and learning how to grow vegetables....

read more
New Agrarian Voices – Ian Trupin

New Agrarian Voices – Ian Trupin

Ian Trupin, APPRENTICE, XK Bar Ranch, COTAKE A PEEK INTO THE DAILY LIFE OF AN APPRENTICE BY READING THEIR RESPONSES TO THESE QUESTIONS.   What is something you do every day? I let the chickens out, collect eggs, feed them, and shut them in every day. Most of my...

read more
New Agrarian Voices – Dylan Jones

New Agrarian Voices – Dylan Jones

Dylan Jones, APPRENTICE, Sol Ranch, NMTAKE A PEEK INTO THE DAILY LIFE OF AN APPRENTICE BY READING THEIR RESPONSES TO THESE QUESTIONS.   What is something you do every day? I wake up on the right side of the dirt, surrounded by beautiful country. What items do you...

read more
New Agrarian Voices – DeAnne Gabriel

New Agrarian Voices – DeAnne Gabriel

DeAnne Gabriel, APPRENTICE, Indian Ridge Farm, COREFLECTIONS AFTER THE FIRST MONTH I am a woman who follows her heart. Every time I feel the pull of something new, I marvel at how lucky I am to get to go with the flow and see where it will take me. From a life of...

read more
New Agrarian Voices – Dave LeFavre

New Agrarian Voices – Dave LeFavre

Dave LeFevre, APPRENTICE, Indian Ridge Farm, COREFLECTIONS AFTER THE FIRST MONTH Even though it has only been 3 weeks at Indian Ridge Farm it definitely feels like it’s been easily over a month! Every day has been filled with perfectly amazing sights and sounds,...

read more
New Agrarian Voices – Christopher Mellen

New Agrarian Voices – Christopher Mellen

Christopher Mellen, APPRENTICE, Round River Resource Management, COMy Pursuit of Regenerative Agriculture Happiness It was a dark and stormy night riddled with the sounds of raindrops sprinkling down on the tin roof of the hospital. Muffled screams were heard just...

read more
New Agrarian Voices – Charlotte Moore

New Agrarian Voices – Charlotte Moore

Charlotte, APPRENTICE, Tooley's Trees, NMReflections after the First Month   Before I wanted to be a farmer, I wanted to be a social worker. Understanding people, discovering why they are the way they are was one of my first passions in life. Quickly, I realized...

read more