Growing vegetables for fun and massive profit … really?

Paul and Elizabeth Kaiser went into farming because it seemed like an earth-friendly way to make a living–and they brought a lot of knowledge and innovation to the process. The result: Singing Frogs Farm is a thriving, productive place that has a new harvest every few months, pays good wages, and makes an order of magnitude more money per acre than other farms in the same area–even organic farms and vineyards. How do they do it? It’s all about understanding the big picture. Instead of, ‘I’m going to grow cauliflower,’ it’s more like ‘I’m going to cultivate a farm on which cauliflower will flourish because everything the entire living system around it–soil, bugs, worms, people, etc.–is healthy.’

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